Poetry: Five Bodies

Inspired by moments of unknowingness, invention and imagination, Five Bodies brings together some of the most outstanding British and international poets to share experiences of contemporary poetry.

The series welcomes unexpected ideas, experimental drifts and multiple voices following a long-standing tradition in poetry writing that melds perceiving, sensing, feeling and knowing as knowledge-making practices. Five Bodies asks how language invites communion with the sensorial, social, and political bodies and considers ways of relating to one another in the digital space.

With contributions by Nottingham-based poets, Sarah Jackson, Linda Kemp, Lila Matsumoto and Vicky Sparrow, along with new readings by Mirene Arsanios, Victoria Adukwei Bulley, J. R. Carpenter, Jesse Darling, Rowan Evans, James Goodwin, Johanna Hedva, Bhanu Kapil, Donika Kelly, Maureen M. Mclane, Sandeep Parmar, Nisha Ramayya, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Ariana Reines, Himali Singh Soin and Simone White.

Five Bodies is collaboratively developed with the Critical Poetics research group at Nottingham Trent University. Its sibling Five Bodies workshop expands on the work of one poet through creative-critical engagement, hybrid methodologies and experimental thinking.

Online. Free. This event will be livestreamed on Youtube.

Programme

6.30-7pm: Jesse Darling
7-7.20pm: Johanna Hedva
7.20-7.40pm: Kameelah Janan Rasheed
7.45pm-8.30pm: Dialogue

Chair: Olivia Aherne

About the event

Online. Free. Live Stream.
You can access this event through this webpage and on the Nottingham Contemporary YouTube channel.
There will be live captioning for this event.
We are unable to provide British Sign Language interpretation for this event.
This event will include real-time transcription. A transcription will be available for download on this webpage afterwards.
A recording of the event will be available afterwards.
The duration of the event is two hours. A five-minute rest break is included.

Olivia Aherne is Assistant Curator – Exhibitions at Nottingham Contemporary.

Jesse Darling is an artist in Berlin and sometimes London who lives and works. In various materials JD makes things for places that people put their bodies to look at art and also for the internet to look at and to put in books and as gifts, wherever possible and necessary, or not. JD has studied, exhibited, published and so on.

Johanna Hedva is a Korean-American writer, artist, musician, and astrologer. Hedva is the author of Minerva the Miscarriage of the Brain, a collection of poems, performances, and essays, and the novel On Hell. Their album The Sun and the Moon was released in 2019, and the LP, Black Moon Lilith in Pisces in the 4th House, a doom-metal guitar and voice performance influenced by Korean shamanist ritual will be released in January 2021. Their work has been shown at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Klosterruine, and Institute of Cultural Inquiry, Berlin; The Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, Performance Space New York, the LA Architecture and Design Museum, as well as the Museum of Contemporary Art on the Moon. Their writing has appeared in Triple Canopy, Frieze, Lithub, The White Review, and is anthologized in Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art.

Kameelah Janan Rasheed grapples with the poetics, politics, and pleasures of the unfinished. With interests in the generative qualities of incompleteness, leakage, dispersal, and syncretism, Rasheed works across an ecosystem of iterative and provisional projects that have been exhibited at New Museum, New York; Transmissions Gallery, Glasgow; Rice University, Houston; Brooklyn Public Library, New York; Brooklyn Historical Society, New York; and Brooklyn Museum, New York, in addition to public installations with Public Art Fund and For Freedoms/Times Square Arts. Her work has also been exhibited at the 2017 Venice Biennale, and will be included in the Glasgow International (2021) and Prospect.5 (2021). She is the author of two artist books, An Alphabetical Accumulation of Approximate Observations (2019) and No New Theories (2019).

Supported by: