Site Navigation

Globalisation

The word globalisation was coined in the 1960s - and mainly used in the context of finance, economics, and other academic disciplines. At its core, it relates to financial systems, defining a process that has allowed markets to operate internationally, supported by communication technology, de-regulation, de-nationalisation and the decline of traditional industries. Its entry into everyday speech has been aided by movements against the process of globalisation - or otherwise critical of its negative effects such as the out-sourcing of cheap labour to sweatshops and the increasing power large transnational corporations hold over the multiple nations that they invest in. Globalisation can be more broadly understood, however, as any process of making something worldwide in its scope or application. In the context of contemporary art it may be used, more positively, to describe a geographically expanded view of the art world, but also negatively, as a system that has exacerbated economic imbalance and speeded ecological decline.

Related Material

Events

Events - Talks

The Geopolitical Turn

Audio Archived Online

What are the reference points for contemporary art in a global economy that creates enormous wealth...
Events - Talks

Xenospace

Video Archived Online

Angus Cameron, Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Leicester and emissary of the...
Events - Talks

New Geographies of Globalisation

Video Archived Online

Three speakers from The University of Nottingham's School of Geography present global case studies....
Events - Talks

Contemporary Art & The Politics of Ecology

Video Archived Online

Featuring Peter Mörtenböck (on the World of Matter project) and Nabil Ahmed (on Radical...
Events - Talks

Piero Gilardi Walkthrough with Rhiannon Firth

Video Archived Online

Author of Utopian Politics: Citizenship and Practice and Lecturer in Sociology at Brunel, Rhiannon...

Supporters