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Micromosaics by Fabrizio Manacorda

Micromosaics by Fabrizio Manacorda

Des Hughes

Des Hughes

The Small Collections Room

The Small Collections Room

Art - Small Collections Room

The Small Collections Room

Des Hughes, Fabrizio Manacorda, Trevor Paglen

23 Oct 2010 - 24 Dec 2010

Des Hughes
The two largest cabinets contain a new exhibition by Des Hughes, who has gathered an eccentric and engaging collection of found objects, including “antlers, horns, claws, feather and other things that belong to strange and curious animals,” he says. His humorous constructions are never quite what they seem. Bone-shaped dog biscuits that make up a skeleton hand are actually carefully crafted from jesmonite and sandstone. Hand modelled versions of mangled safety pins are cast in resin. Spot the tiny man made of corn snacks.

Symbology by Trevor Paglen
A collection of military patches from covert operations undertaken by the US Air Force. Called “Symbology” this is an ongoing project by artist and geographer Trevor Paglen. Paglen’s accompanying interpretations of these patches helps to describe the responsibilities undertaken by these secret factions within the US military including the testing of military hardware and the secret flights that ferry terrorist suspects as part of the so-called War on Terror.

Micromosaics by Fabrizio Manacorda
Exquisite micro-mosaics from Italy dating from the 18th and 19th centuries, they are made of tiny pieces of coloured glass – containing up to 5,000 per square inch. In fact they are not unlike the images made up of pixels that we see on our computer screens. They proved to be very popular with young noblemen, who brought them back as souvenirs from their Grand Tours.

The Cabinets
We commissioned the artist Pablo Bronstein to create a 21st century take on a “cabinet of curiosities” or wunderkammer – the root of the modern museum.

Four ornate cabinets, dating from the 17th to the 19th centuries, have been given their own space off The Study, designed by Bronstein and our architects Caruso St John. These intricate places of discovery reflect Bronstein’s interest in Baroque and Neo-Classical architecture. They also have an affinity with contemporary art’s concern with collecting and display.

The contents of each cabinet form miniature exhibitions, curated by artists, writers and cultural commentators.

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